Best Vocational Training Programs for Disabled in 2017

Being disabled should not be a reason for anyone to be excluded from getting an education. Many disabled individuals find it difficult to access programs which cater for their unique needs, especially in the vocational training space. We have taken some time to identify the best vocational training programs for disabled in 2017. However, before we look at the three schools we identified, let’s look at the benefits of a vocational education. Vocational training for the disabled offers a chance for employers to bring diversity into the workplace. People living with disabilities also need to know that there are specific laws which protect them.


The Benefits of Vocational Training for Students with Disabilities

Vocational training is training that focuses more on practical subjects than the theory. While many students with disabilities find it easier to enroll for a four-year degree, a growing number is starting to realize the benefits of vocational training. These students are starting to realize that a vocational path takes less time than a conventional university degree. These programs also cost less. According to the Community for Accredited Local Schools the completion rate in vocational colleges in the United States is 23 percent higher than that of four-year institutions.

Selecting A Vocational School For The Disabled

Disabled people have special needs. This is the reason why selection the right school for disabled people is something which should be approached with special care. The following are some of the things you should ensure are available before enrolling into the school.

Policies. Ask to read the policy of the school when it comes to the education of the disabled. If the school does not have a policy, it is not good for you. This indicates that the school is not geared towards making the life of disabled people easier.

Modifications In Buildings. Ensure that the buildings of the school you select have such modifications as elevators, ramps, and other such modifications designed to make someone on a wheelchair or crutches can move easily around.

Assistive Equipment. Disabled people require modified devices. Look for modified computers, adjustable desks, microphones and headsets, and automatic lights that can make the life of a disabled person easier while they are studying.


The UPMC Vocational Training Center

The UPMC is a vocational school that offers vocational programs for adults and individuals living with intellectual disabilities. The school operates from Pittsburg in the US State of Philadelphia. The training center aims to provide quality training and meaningful work to individuals who would find an organized therapeutic setting suitable. Students in this school complete real jobs. They are assessed for work readiness and they are paid for the work they perform while on training.

The Supported Employment Program

Another service offered by this vocational training school is the Supported Employment Program. This program finds jobs for adults who have disabilities. This includes people who suffer from autism. Every individual gets assessed to gauge which jobs would be suitable for them. The program also offers services for high school students who are preparing to enter the job market.

Mailing Services

One of the biggest departments inside which disabled learners get trained for skills that will later be required in the workplace is the Mailing Services for Business. This center is equipped to handle various sizes of jobs. Students get supervision from trained staff to process bulk mail and print labels among other such tasks.

To find out more about this vocational college, you can visit their website or call them on 412-235-5465. They are open from Monday through Friday between 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Nassau Boces Adult Education

Vocational Training – Intensive Support Programs (ISP) at the Nassau Boces Adult Education provides vocational training programs for the disabled through the Intensive Support Program. The aim of this program is to assist students to learn specific skills that will allow them to enter the workplace. These programs are available at their BOCES Barry Tech.

Times. Classes for the disabled start at 2:30 pm and end at 6 pm between Monday and Thursday. On Fridays, lessons run between 9 am and 12 pm. Students complete a part of the training on the job with a dedicated supervisor. The college offers the courses in fall and spring.

Cost. The cost of the training is $4 300. However, this can change, so students who want to enroll in this college can call the Career Support Services at 516-622-6832 or send an email to adulted@nasboces.org.

Programs Offered

Disabled students can enroll into the following programs;

  • Office Skills
  • Pet Care and Grooming
  • Stock Inventory
  • Culinary Arts
  • Building Maintenance
  • Direct Care
  • Auto Lube Specialist

The Summit Center

The Vocational & Employment Services is a program of The Summit Center. This program is available for adults with developmental disabilities and those affected by autism who are in the labor market looking for gainful employment. The program equips individuals with the skills required for accessing and maintaining gainful employment through pre-training that prepares them for vocational training and them supporting them to navigate the labor market when they look for employment. The aim of this college is to assist disabled people who have developmental disabilities to become productive members of their communities.

Pre-Vocation and Community Experience (P.A.C.E.)

This program offers pre-vocational training aimed at giving students real work experience. The aim of the program is to encourage individuals to look for gainful employment. The Summit Center continues to support students even when they are in the workplace.

Eligibility

Individuals should meet the following criteria before enrolling into the program;

  • Show a willingness to move to gainful employment
  • Possess the ability to work without supervision for short periods of time
  • Have basic communication ability
  • Be eligible for OPWDD Community Pre-Vocational services
  • Possess the ability to learn social grooming and have basic hygiene skills
  • Be able to eat and use the toilet independently

For more information about this program, prospective students can download a brochure here.


Final Thoughts

The programs we have included in this article are just a few examples showing that a disability is not an inability. Students and adults with disabilities can contribute to their societies if they receive the necessary support.

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